Consumer Goods: What “Organic” Really Means

organic food productsThe words "organic" and "natural" on labels often promote beauty products, soaps, and shampoos. You’ll also see the terms "GMO-free" or "non-GMO," which can classify different kinds of food. But what do they mean? believes that the best way to preserve the planet is through organic agriculture. So the labels may mean putting money in the pockets of the farmers or protecting humankind and even ensuring a sustainable way of living for a better future.

By Definition

Organic, in relation to food production, involves growing food without human-made fertilizers, pesticides, or chemical enhancers. Organic farming means raising livestock in the most natural way possible: cage-free and without any genetic modifications.

The Consumer

Sadly, many marketing strategies include the use of “organic” without truly understanding how it affects the consumer. And consumers buy into that strategy thinking that they're helping the world in some way.

For example, an aloe vera shampoo bottle may have “organic” on its label because it has extracts from the plant. But the shampoo contains the chemical Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), which makes it lather up when applied to hair. SLS causes environmental damage; it’s also a carcinogen and skin irritant. So is the shampoo still organic if most of its components are not and are harmful to the user?

The World

Buying organic fruits and vegetables is not only safer and healthier. It also preserves the natural state of the produce in farms and helps the farmers grow them without the need for expensive pesticides and chemical fertilizers. If this practice thrives throughout the world, it'll secure a healthier future for the younger generations.

The Takeaway

Be critical of labels. The next time you see the word "organic" on a beauty product, look at the rest of its ingredients and make sure none of them are harmful to the environment or your skin.